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The United States supported Panama’s rebellion against Colombia because they wanted to build a canal through the Isthmus of Panama. The United States had negotiated with Colombia for the right to build the canal, but the negotiations had failed. By supporting Panama’s rebellion, the United States was able to gain control of the area and build the canal with fewer complications.

Panama crisis of 1885

US military intervention in a rebellion in Panama
Panama Crisis of 1885
pm-map.png
isthmus of panama
Meeting 1885
Location
Result

Chilean-Colombian diplomatic victory

belligerents
Panamanian rebels
U.S
Colombia
Chile

The Panama Crisis of 1885 It was an intervention by U.S in support of a rebellion in Panamaat the time part Colombiaand a resulting show of force by Chile.

Background

the 1846 Mallarino-Bidlack Treatysigned by Republic of New Grenada (Colombia and Panama) it’s the U.Sforced the United States to maintain “neutrality” in the Colombian state of Panama in exchange for transit rights across the isthmus on behalf of Colombia.

Chile’s influence in the region followed its victory in pacific war. In this war, Chile defeated Bolivia and Peru and gained large tracts of territory from both, removing Bolivia’s access to the sea. US imperialist economic interests are with Bolivia and Peru, and Chile has rejected US attempts at mediation. A Peruvian attempt to cede a naval base to the US in chimbote The bay was blocked in 1881 when Chile, aware of the agreement, sent marines to occupy Chimbote.

panama crisis

In March 1885, Colombia reduced its military presence in Panama, sending troops that were stationed there to fight rebels in Panama. Cartagena. These favorable conditions led to an insurgency in Panama. The United States Navy he was sent there to maintain order, with a view to invoking his obligations under the treaty signed in 1846.

On April 7, the screw sloop uss shenandoah arrived at Panama City and three days later, other American ships started to arrive Colon, Panama. On April 27, a force of Marines landed in Panama City to help quell rebels who had seized the city when local troops left to deal with an uprising in Colón. The next day, federal troops from Colombia arrived from Buenaventura, the closest port to Colombia on the Pacific. By this time, there was also a small Colombian National Army force supported by a strong contingent of American troops in Colón.

In response to American intervention, Chile sent the protected cruiser Emerald for Panama Cityarriving on April 28th. EmeraldThe ship’s captain was ordered to prevent any possible annexation of Panama by the United States by any means. According to an American publication of August 1885, shortly after the events in Panama, “[The Esmeralda] could destroy our entire navy ship by ship and never be touched once.”

See too

Grades


Source: Panama crisis of 1885
Wikipedia

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