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What Is The Difference Between Roasting And Baking Vegetables

You roast a whole chicken, and you baking chicken parmesan, right?

Well … yes. But these days, the difference is mostly a matter of semantics. Initially, “roasting” meant cooking over high heat as in a whole chicken on a spit. Today, though, you typically roast that whole chicken in the oven, where you do the cooking as well. Both methods use dry heat to cook the inside and crisp the outside.

Chef John's Salt Roasted Chicken
Photo by chef Giovanni.

If you want to get technical, this is it. When you roast a chicken, squash, or rack of lamb, you’re roasting something that’s essentially whole. It has a complete structure, a unity about it. On the other hand, when you bake bread or a chicken casserole, you’re cooking a collection of distinct ingredients into a uniform whole; through cooking, they become one. Here are some top-rated chicken casserole recipes to help you ponder the distinction.

There are other almost defining characteristics of roasting versus baking. Is the oven temperature around 400 degrees F? You’re heading into roasting territory. Did you cover the pan? You could bake. Just be careful not to be braise (which would require some liquid in the pot and a tight lid). Have you basted? You’re probably roasting.

Bottom line: There are many gray areas where you could use baked and roasted interchangeably.

Ready for some top-notch chicken dinner ideas? Check out a dozen of our favorite baked chicken recipes.

VIDEO: Roast Chicken with Herbs

Watch this short video to see how to prepare a great roast chicken with fresh orange, some garlic and fresh rosemary, thyme and sage.


I want more? Check out our collection of baked and roasted chicken recipes.



You roast a whole chicken, and you baking chicken parmesan, right?

Well … yes. But these days, the difference is mostly a matter of semantics. Initially, “roasting” meant cooking over high heat as in a whole chicken on a spit. Today, though, you typically roast that whole chicken in the oven, where you do the cooking as well. Both methods use dry heat to cook the inside and crisp the outside.

Chef John's Salt Roasted Chicken
Photo by chef Giovanni.

If you want to get technical, this is it. When you roast a chicken, squash, or rack of lamb, you’re roasting something that’s essentially whole. It has a complete structure, a unity about it. On the other hand, when you bake bread or a chicken casserole, you’re cooking a collection of distinct ingredients into a uniform whole; through cooking, they become one. Here are some top-rated chicken casserole recipes to help you ponder the distinction.

There are other almost defining characteristics of roasting versus baking. Is the oven temperature around 400 degrees F? You’re heading into roasting territory. Did you cover the pan? You could bake. Just be careful not to be braise (which would require some liquid in the pot and a tight lid). Have you basted? You’re probably roasting.

Bottom line: There are many gray areas where you could use baked and roasted interchangeably.

Ready for some top-notch chicken dinner ideas? Check out a dozen of our favorite baked chicken recipes.

VIDEO: Roast Chicken with Herbs

Watch this short video to see how to prepare a great roast chicken with fresh orange, some garlic and fresh rosemary, thyme and sage.


I want more? Check out our collection of baked and roasted chicken recipes.



Video about What Is The Difference Between Roasting And Baking Vegetables

ROASTING VS BAKING II Difference Between Roasting & Baking

What’s the Difference Between Roasting and Baking?

While these cooking methods are nearly identical in today’s kitchen, there are actually a few things that set them apart.

•Structure of the food:
This is the primary factor that sets these cooking methods apart.
Roasting involves cooking foods that already have a solid structure before the cooking process begins (think: meat and vegetables).
Baking involves that foods that lack structure early on, then become solid and lose their “empty space” during the cooking (think: cakes and muffins).

•Temperature:
Various sources note that the temperature setting on the oven also distinguishes these two cooking method.

Roasting requires a higher temperature (400°F and above) to create a browned, flavorful “crust” on the outside of the food being cooked, while baking occurs at lower oven temperatures (up to 375°F).

•Fat content:
While many baked goods contain fat within, an outer coating of fat, such as vegetables or meat brushed with olive oil, is an indicator of roasting.

•Covered pan: Roasting is typically done in an open, uncovered pan, while items that are baked may be covered.

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Source: www.allrecipes.com