You are searching about What Is A Pie Bird Used For, today we will share with you article about What Is A Pie Bird Used For was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic What Is A Pie Bird Used For is useful to you.

What Is A Pie Bird Used For

We independently source, test, review and recommend the best products – learn more about our process. If you purchase something through our links, we may earn a commission.

Le Creuset Bird Cake

Photo: Amazonia

Pie birds can look like unusual action figures, lined up like soldiers in a dish cabinet or tucked away safely in a utensil drawer until called into action. But maybe pie birds really are heroes. At least, they’re heroes in the baking world.

Bird-shaped ceramic vents can prevent soggy bottom crusts, save cakes from overflowing, and prevent the center of a crust from sinking like the Titanic. Read on to find out how pie birds work, and learn when you need to use one.


What is a pie bird?

Cake birds are hollow ceramic baking utensils that vent cakes as they bake. These quaint funnels collect moisture from the bubbling pie filling and send it out through the spouts as hot steam. This prevents the filling from overflowing. The figurine also supports the surrounding crust, which keeps it from sinking into the filling and turning into a soggy mess.

Most cake birds are made from stoneware or ceramic. They can be glazed with colored enamel coatings; some are even painted to look like blackbirds, canaries or cardinals, or elaborately painted with yellow beaks and multicolored feathers. Others might be modeled entirely on different animals, from forest creatures to mythical dragons.

Pie birds — or pie funnels, pie chimneys, pie air vents, or pie whistles, as they’re sometimes called — were first used in Europe several hundred years ago. They gained popularity in the mid to late 19th century. But it wasn’t until the 1940s, when pie birds became widely manufactured and coveted as much for a collector’s item as a utilitarian device, that birds were used more widely. Today, however, they remain somewhat obscure and are often not known outside of the serious pastry crowd.


How to use a cake bird

Pie birds aren’t necessary, but they help prevent soggy crusts and sticky messes. So, whether you’ve got one — and you’re planning on making a savory meat pie or a sweet pie — here’s how you can use your pie bird properly.

The mysterious, murderous, meaty past of mince pies

1. Prepare the cake dough.

Make your pie dough according to recipe directions, like the ones for this buttercream pie crust. Pie birds are only needed for double-crust pie, like this Fresh Pear Pie, so if your recipe doesn’t use a bottom and top crust, you don’t need to use a pie bird.

2. Roll out the crust.

Roll the dough to fit the pie plate and gently press the dough evenly around the sides and bottom of the pie plate. You don’t need to pre-bake the crust if you’re using a pie bird.

3. Fill the cake.

Place your pie bird in the center of the pie plate, on top of the pie crust (bottom). Do not press the pie bird into the crust. Scoop your pie filling into the crust, around the pie bird.

4. Place the top crust.

Cut an X in the center of the second pie crust. Or, if you know how big the hole needs to be, you can cut a circle big enough for the bird. Lower the pie crust over the bird’s head and onto the top of the pie.

If the bird doesn’t fit in the crack, gently press the dough around the bird until the pie bird’s head is protruding from the crust. It’s okay if the scab touches the bird. Steam comes out of the top of the funnel.

5. Cook as directed.

Follow your recipe instructions to bake your cake. As the pie bakes, steam will collect inside the pie bird and escape from the spout. Some pigeons even make a whistling sound, just like a kettle, when steam builds.

When the cake is done baking, you can remove it from the oven, but leave the bird in place. Removing it could cause the scab to sink. Simply slice the cake around the bird, and when it frees itself from the surrounding cake pieces, you can remove and wash it.


Bake without bird cake

If you don’t have a pie bird, don’t worry. Most people don’t use cake birds and their cakes are still sooooo good. Instead of pie birds, you can cut a few vents in the crust to allow steam to escape. This won’t help your lower crust, but it will do the important job of preventing a big mess.

Get creative with the air vents on your cake. You can make individual slits in the crust, or you can use cookie cutters to make fun shapes like in this cherry pie.


Where do I buy a cake bird?

cake bird
Le Creuset

Retailers like Amazon carry a number of different pie birds. We love the classic Le Creuset Pie Bird; it is available in a variety of colored enamel finishes. You may even be able to pair your new pie bird with your favorite Le Creuset cookware.

Collectables and antiques sites like eBay and Etsy also carry a variety of cake birds. We love these handmade stoneware cake birds.

You can also scour shelves and cabinets at antique stores, consignment shops, and estate sales. Pie birds may not be the most well-known baking accessory, but they have a strong following of people who have baked with them and love how they help the texture and final look of their pie.

Related content:

  • 10 tips for making the best cakes
  • 9 creative ways to decorate eye-popping pie crusts
  • Browse our collection of pie crusts.


Pie birds can look like unusual action figures, lined up like soldiers in a dish cabinet or tucked away safely in a utensil drawer until called into action. But maybe pie birds really are heroes. At least, they’re heroes in the baking world.

Bird-shaped ceramic vents can prevent soggy bottom crusts, save cakes from overflowing, and prevent the center of a crust from sinking like the Titanic. Read on to find out how pie birds work, and learn when you need to use one.


What is a pie bird?

Cake birds are hollow ceramic baking utensils that vent cakes as they bake. These quaint funnels collect moisture from the bubbling pie filling and send it out through the spouts as hot steam. This prevents the filling from overflowing. The figurine also supports the surrounding crust, which keeps it from sinking into the filling and turning into a soggy mess.

Most cake birds are made from stoneware or ceramic. They can be glazed with colored enamel coatings; some are even painted to look like blackbirds, canaries or cardinals, or elaborately painted with yellow beaks and multicolored feathers. Others might be modeled entirely on different animals, from forest creatures to mythical dragons.

Pie birds — or pie funnels, pie chimneys, pie air vents, or pie whistles, as they’re sometimes called — were first used in Europe several hundred years ago. They gained popularity in the mid to late 19th century. But it wasn’t until the 1940s, when pie birds became widely manufactured and coveted as much for a collector’s item as a utilitarian device, that birds were used more widely. Today, however, they remain somewhat obscure and are often not known outside of the serious pastry crowd.


How to use a cake bird

Pie birds aren’t necessary, but they help prevent soggy crusts and sticky messes. So, whether you’ve got one — and you’re planning on making a savory meat pie or a sweet pie — here’s how you can use your pie bird properly.

The mysterious, murderous, meaty past of mince pies

1. Prepare the cake dough.

Make your pie dough according to recipe directions, like the ones for this buttercream pie crust. Pie birds are only needed for double-crust pie, like this Fresh Pear Pie, so if your recipe doesn’t use a bottom and top crust, you don’t need to use a pie bird.

2. Roll out the crust.

Roll the dough to fit the pie plate and gently press the dough evenly around the sides and bottom of the pie plate. You don’t need to pre-bake the crust if you’re using a pie bird.

3. Fill the cake.

Place your pie bird in the center of the pie plate, on top of the pie crust (bottom). Do not press the pie bird into the crust. Scoop your pie filling into the crust, around the pie bird.

4. Place the top crust.

Cut an X in the center of the second pie crust. Or, if you know how big the hole needs to be, you can cut a circle big enough for the bird. Lower the pie crust over the bird’s head and onto the top of the pie.

If the bird doesn’t fit in the crack, gently press the dough around the bird until the pie bird’s head is protruding from the crust. It’s okay if the scab touches the bird. Steam comes out of the top of the funnel.

5. Cook as directed.

Follow your recipe instructions to bake your cake. As the pie bakes, steam will collect inside the pie bird and escape from the spout. Some pigeons even make a whistling sound, just like a kettle, when steam builds.

When the cake is done baking, you can take it out of the oven, but leave the bird in place. Removing it could cause the scab to sink. Simply slice the cake around the bird, and when it frees itself from the surrounding cake pieces, you can remove and wash it.


Bake without bird cake

If you don’t have a pie bird, don’t worry. Most people don’t use cake birds and their cakes are still sooooo good. Instead of pie birds, you can cut a few vents in the crust to allow steam to escape. This won’t help your lower crust, but it will do the important job of preventing a big mess.

Get creative with the air vents on your cake. You can make individual slits in the crust, or you can use cookie cutters to make fun shapes like in this cherry pie.


Where do I buy a cake bird?

cake bird
Le Creuset

Retailers like Amazon carry a number of different pie birds. We love the classic Le Creuset Pie Bird; it is available in a variety of colored enamel finishes. You may even be able to pair your new pie bird with your favorite Le Creuset cookware.

Collectables and antiques sites like eBay and Etsy also carry a variety of cake birds. We love these handmade stoneware cake birds.

You can also scour shelves and cabinets at antique stores, consignment shops, and estate sales. Pie birds may not be the most well-known baking accessory, but they have a strong following of people who have baked with them and love how they help the texture and final look of their pie.

Related content:

  • 10 tips for making the best cakes
  • 9 creative ways to decorate eye-popping pie crusts
  • Browse our collection of pie crusts.


Video about What Is A Pie Bird Used For

Pie Bird-Porcelain Pie Bird- Mrs. Anderson’s Baking

*Mrs. Anderson’s Pie Bird allows steam to escape from meat and fruit pies to reduce spillage and prevent top crusts from sagging while the pie bakes
*Made from fine quality porcelain; strong and durable; fun and functional; flat base adds stability during use
*Steam vents through the bird’s beak to prevent pie filling from bubbling over; top crust is supported by the bird?s shoulders, eliminating bowed crust|Place bird at center of bottom crust, spoon in filling, add top crust with small hole so bird sticks out, pinch crust around bird to seal, and bake
*Allow to cool slightly before removing as Pie Bird will be hot; dishwasher safe for easy cleanup

Question about What Is A Pie Bird Used For

If you have any questions about What Is A Pie Bird Used For, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article What Is A Pie Bird Used For was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article What Is A Pie Bird Used For helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles What Is A Pie Bird Used For

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 7643
Views: 28156853

Search keywords What Is A Pie Bird Used For

What Is A Pie Bird Used For
way What Is A Pie Bird Used For
tutorial What Is A Pie Bird Used For
What Is A Pie Bird Used For free

Source: www.allrecipes.com