Systematic names are preferred over common names because they are more precise, standardized, and consistent. Systematic names are assigned to organisms according to a strict set of rules that are based on the organism’s characteristics, such as its genus and species. This ensures that the same name is always used for the same organism, no matter where it is found. Common names, on the other hand, can vary from place to place and can be confusing when discussing organisms with people from different regions.

Systematic name

AN systematic name is a name systematically given to a single group, organism, object, or chemical substance, from a specific population or collection. Systematic names are usually part of a nomenclature.

AN semisystematic name or semitrivial name is a name that has at least one systematic part and at least one trivial part, like a chemical vernacular name.

Creating systematic names can be as simple as assigning a prefix or a number for each object (in this case they are a type of numbering scheme), or as complex as encoding the complete structure of the object in the name. Many systems combine some information about the named object with an extra sequence number to turn it into a unique identifier.

Systematic names usually coexist with previous common names assigned before the creation of any systematic naming system. For example, many common chemicals are still referred to by their common or common names, even by chemists.

in chemistry

In chemistry, a systematic name describes the chemical structure of a chemical substancethus giving some information about its chemical properties.

The Compendium of Chemical Terminology published by IUPAC defines systematic name as “a name composed entirely of specially coined or selected syllables, with or without numerical prefixes; eg, pentane, oxazole”. However, when trivial names become part of chemical nomenclature, can be the systematic name of a substance or part of it. Examples of some systematic names that have trivial origins are benzene (cyclohexatriene) or glycerol (trihydroxypropane).

Examples

There are standardized systematic or semi-systematic names for:

See too

External Links

References


Source: Systematic name
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Search keywords Systematic Names Are Preferred Over Common Names Because Common Names

1. Binomial nomenclature
2. Taxonomy
3. Classification
4. Genus
5. Species
6. Phylogeny
7. Linnaean system
8. Nomenclature codes
9. Nomenclatural hierarchy
10. Hierarchical classification
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