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How To Make A Vanilla Milkshake From Mcdonald'S

Hand holding a french fries by dipping it in a vanilla milkshake

Photo: Tyrel Stendahl/Dotdash Meredith

Confession: I’m not a toppings girl. I eat dry salads, hamburgers with nothing but a wedge of American or cheddar cheese (maybe a lettuce leaf, as long as it’s iceberg), naked hot dogs, and tacos garnished with cilantro, they hold the sauce. And when I eat french fries, I don’t feel like dipping them in ketchup, but rather in a McDonald’s vanilla milkshake.


My childhood with fries and milkshakes

As a kid, getting takeout from McDonald’s was for special occasions: birthday dinners, last day of school celebrations, a good report card, and, of course, the occasional “we don’t feel like cooking” night at my parents’. My order was always the same: Chicken McNuggets, fries and a vanilla milkshake. I’m not sure why I first dived in, but once I did I never swapped for basic ketchup. Squeezing a hot, salty fry out of the red and yellow carton and instantly dipping it into that icy vanilla (never chocolate and definitely not strawberry) milkshake was an art of contrasts. It provided the same feeling as, say, lying on a beach with a romantic book to read in one day in one hand and strawberry daiquiri in the other. Pure and genuine bliss

During school lunches, I asked my fifth grade classmates whether they were on the right or wrong side of history: some indulged just like me, others insisted that, to my horror, a Wendy’s Frosty was better than McDonald’s, and a few looked at me with such horror, I never spoke to them again.

Then I grew up. I left the cafeteria policy and also left behind McDonald’s as an adult. But my culinary memory persisted. And I felt good about it: Studies have shown that people who have fond memories of their childhoods are more likely to have better health, less depression, and fewer chronic diseases later in life. But that got me thinking: Could that magic last? Would I still like a warm handful of French fries dipped in an ice cold fast food drink? I had to try it. And what better time, I thought, than the week of my wedding to do that?


Test mating as an adult

I made my way to the same hometown McDonald’s that I frequented in my childhood. Pushing through the door, I noticed one thing: We’d both been experiencing a much-needed glow since 2004; me, free of body fat and with fresh balayage highlights, McDonald’s #301 with new orange counter stools and digital menus. Another jolt of passing time: French fries and a smoothie cost nearly $10. Did that warrant a dollop of whipped cream on the smoothie? I’ll leave it to the reader to decide.

Time to try: I sat down, took the lid off the milkshake, scooped the whipped cream straight into the trash (in the name of texture), grabbed a single potato chip, dipped it in, and tasted it. The fries, even thinner than I remembered them at the time, were hot and low on salt. The jolt was, and I mean this with all the love in my heart, so sweet, so vanilla it couldn’t be real vanilla, thick as freshly softened ice cream. It didn’t adhere as well as I remembered, melting off the thin chip quickly, but the cool versus hot crispy fry was just as I remembered. I took three more and pinched them between my fingers, dipping in again to enjoy the larger surface area and more satisfying bite.

I was ready to be disappointed with the whole thing, as dumbfounded by the combination as my former classmates once were. But it was almost perfect and I was just salty from the lack of salt.

I suppose that makes sense. Food is central to the moments that come between us: it’s remembering what you ate on a first date (a bowl of quinoa when all I really wanted was mac and cheese), your high school graduation (Olive Garden), or a Thursday night that celebrate the end of the school year (Chicken McNuggets, French fries and of course a vanilla milkshake). These meals stick to life moments like the toppings we eat with burgers and fries. So pass the shock, please. It’s my all-time favorite french fries seasoning.


Confession: I’m not a toppings girl. I eat dry salads, hamburgers with nothing but a wedge of American or cheddar cheese (maybe a lettuce leaf, as long as it’s iceberg), naked hot dogs, and tacos garnished with cilantro, they hold the sauce. And when I eat french fries, I don’t feel like dipping them in ketchup, but rather in a McDonald’s vanilla milkshake.


My childhood with fries and milkshakes

As a kid, getting takeout from McDonald’s was for special occasions: birthday dinners, last day of school celebrations, a good report card, and, of course, the occasional “we don’t feel like cooking” night at my parents’. My order was always the same: Chicken McNuggets, fries and a vanilla milkshake. I’m not sure why I first dived in, but once I did I never swapped for basic ketchup. Squeezing a hot, salty fry out of the red and yellow carton and instantly dipping it into that icy vanilla (never chocolate and definitely not strawberry) milkshake was an art of contrasts. It provided the same feeling as, say, lying on a beach with a romantic book to read in one day in one hand and strawberry daiquiri in the other. Pure and genuine bliss

During school lunches, I asked my fifth grade classmates whether they were on the right or wrong side of history: some indulged just like me, others insisted that, to my horror, a Wendy’s Frosty was better than McDonald’s, and a few looked at me with such horror, I never spoke to them again.

Then I grew up. I left the cafeteria policy and also left behind McDonald’s as an adult. But my culinary memory persisted. And I felt good about it: Studies have shown that people who have fond memories of their childhoods are more likely to have better health, less depression, and fewer chronic diseases later in life. But that got me thinking: Could that magic last? Would I still like a warm handful of French fries dipped in an ice cold fast food drink? I had to try it. And what better time, I thought, than the week of my wedding to do that?


Test mating as an adult

I made my way to the same hometown McDonald’s that I frequented in my childhood. Pushing through the door, I noticed one thing: We’d both been experiencing a much-needed glow since 2004; me, free of body fat and with fresh balayage highlights, McDonald’s #301 with new orange counter stools and digital menus. Another jolt of passing time: French fries and a smoothie cost nearly $10. Did that warrant a dollop of whipped cream on the smoothie? I’ll leave it to the reader to decide.

Time to try: I sat down, took the lid off the milkshake, scooped the whipped cream straight into the trash (in the name of texture), grabbed a single potato chip, dipped it in, and tasted it. The fries, even thinner than I remembered them at the time, were hot and low on salt. The jolt was, and I mean this with all the love in my heart, so sweet, so vanilla it couldn’t be real vanilla, thick as freshly softened ice cream. It didn’t adhere as well as I remembered, melting off the thin chip quickly, but the cool versus hot crispy fry was just as I remembered. I took three more and pinched them between my fingers, dipping in again to enjoy the larger surface area and more satisfying bite.

I was ready to be disappointed with the whole thing, as dumbfounded by the combination as my former classmates once were. But it was almost perfect and I was just salty from the lack of salt.

I suppose that makes sense. Food is central to the moments that come between us: it’s remembering what you ate on a first date (a bowl of quinoa when all I really wanted was mac and cheese), your high school graduation (Olive Garden), or a Thursday night that celebrate the end of the school year (Chicken McNuggets, French fries and of course a vanilla milkshake). These meals stick to life moments like the toppings we eat with burgers and fries. So pass the shock, please. It’s my all-time favorite french fries seasoning.


Video about How To Make A Vanilla Milkshake From Mcdonald'S

McDonalds Vanilla Milkshake

The classic vanilla shake from McDonald’s. It’s made with only 5 ingredients for a cool, tasty treat. In the summer season, a glass of vanilla milkshake can instantly boost you up and for that purpose, the recipe has been shared below. This can now be tried at home too.

Vanilla milkshake recipe:
1 1/2 cup of ice cube
350ml milk
3 scoops of vanilla ice cream
30g vanilla bean chips
1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract

Made with love!
Love you 3000!
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Music by https://youtube.com/ikson
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