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Difference Between Meyer Lemon And Regular Lemon

Have you ever heard of Meyer lemons? If you’re lucky you’ll find these special lemons in the produce department in late winter and early spring. what makes them so special? We are so glad you asked. These enchanting lemons have a sweet, floral flavor that’s perfect for adding to desserts, cocktails, and more. Read on to find out all about Meyer lemons and what makes them different from regular lemons.

Bushel of Meyer lemons on a white background
Meredith/Blaine Fossati


What are Meyer Lemons?

Meyer lemons were first brought to the United States from Beijing, China in the early 20th century. They are named after Frank N. Meyer, a United States Department of Agriculture employee who identified the plant while in China and brought it back to the United States.

Up until that time Meyer lemons had been used mainly in China as decorative houseplants. When chefs like Alice Waters started using them as an ingredient in their dishes, however, it wasn’t long before they went mainstream.

Meyer lemons are a small, sweet hybrid lemon. They are thought to be a cross between a regular lemon (Eureka and Lisbon varieties) and a tangerine. They have a smooth, thin crust with a deep yellow hue. Their flesh is pale orange in color, with a sweet, floral flavour.


What is the difference between Meyer lemons and regular lemons?

The good news is that you can tell the difference between Meyer lemons and regular lemons just by looking at them. Regular lemons are much larger in size and brighter in color than Meyer lemons.

Meyer lemons have deep yellow skin and dark yellow flesh. Their peel is smoother than that of a regular lemon. And they are smaller and rounder than ordinary lemons.

When it comes to taste, it’s easy to distinguish a Meyer lemon from a regular lemon. They are less acidic and sweeter. In fact, when Cook’s Illustrated conducted a pH test, it found that standard lemon juice was 1.3 times more acidic than Meyer lemon juice. There is also a difference in the rinds of the two lemons: the Meyer lemon has a much more fragrant rind when peeled.


Can you replace one with the other?

The answer is, it depends. Because Meyer lemons have a sweeter, more floral flavor than regular lemons, they make a great substitute for regular lemons in dessert recipes.

However, if your recipe calls for a bolder, more acidic flavor from its lemon juice (like this lemon vinaigrette), Meyer lemons won’t deliver the same results as regular lemons in these cases.

If you want to make a Meyer lemon recipe but don’t have any on hand, you can substitute a mix of equal parts fresh lemon juice and orange juice or tangerine juice. You can also substitute equal parts lemon zest and orange, tangerine, or tangerine zest for grated Meyer lemon zest.


When are Meyer lemons in season?

Meyer lemons are available in stores between December and May. Their limited season and fragile skin (which makes them harder to ship) naturally make them more expensive and harder to find than ordinary lemons.

While the season may be short, you can easily extend it with the help of your freezer. To freeze Meyer lemon juice for later use, freeze the juice in ice cube trays. Transfer the cubes to a freezer bag and store them for up to six months. You can also store the peeled skins by drying them in the sun and adding them to salts, cures and marinades.


Where to buy Meyer lemons

Because of their thin skins, Meyer lemons don’t travel well and aren’t as widely available as regular lemons. They will be more widely available in citrus growing regions (looking at you, Florida). You can find them in some specialty and organic markets during the winter and spring months.


How to store Meyer lemons

Store Meyer lemons in a sealed plastic bag in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. When stored in the refrigerator, Meyer Lemons will keep for up to a week. Stored at room temperature, they will keep for a few days.

Related:

  • Get ready for our top 21 sweet/tart lemon desserts
  • 5 Lively Recipes Lemon Lovers Will Love
  • More lemon recipes.


Have you ever heard of Meyer lemons? If you’re lucky you’ll find these special lemons in the produce department in late winter and early spring. what makes them so special? We are so glad you asked. These enchanting lemons have a sweet, floral flavor that’s perfect for adding to desserts, cocktails, and more. Read on to find out all about Meyer lemons and what makes them different from regular lemons.

Bushel of Meyer lemons on a white background
Meredith/Blaine Fossati


What are Meyer Lemons?

Meyer lemons were first brought to the United States from Beijing, China in the early 20th century. They are named after Frank N. Meyer, a United States Department of Agriculture employee who identified the plant while in China and brought it back to the United States.

Up until that time Meyer lemons had been used mainly in China as decorative houseplants. When chefs like Alice Waters started using them as an ingredient in their dishes, however, it wasn’t long before they went mainstream.

Meyer lemons are a small, sweet hybrid lemon. They are thought to be a cross between a regular lemon (Eureka and Lisbon varieties) and a tangerine. They have a smooth, thin crust with a deep yellow hue. Their flesh is pale orange in color, with a sweet, floral flavour.


What is the difference between Meyer lemons and regular lemons?

The good news is that you can tell the difference between Meyer lemons and regular lemons just by looking at them. Regular lemons are much larger in size and brighter in color than Meyer lemons.

Meyer lemons have deep yellow skin and dark yellow flesh. Their peel is smoother than that of a regular lemon. And they are smaller and rounder than ordinary lemons.

When it comes to taste, it’s easy to distinguish a Meyer lemon from a regular lemon. They are less acidic and sweeter. In fact, when Cook’s Illustrated conducted a pH test, it found that standard lemon juice was 1.3 times more acidic than Meyer lemon juice. There is also a difference in the rinds of the two lemons: the Meyer lemon has a much more fragrant rind when peeled.


Can you replace one with the other?

The answer is, it depends. Because Meyer lemons have a sweeter, more floral flavor than regular lemons, they make a great substitute for regular lemons in dessert recipes.

However, if your recipe calls for a bolder, more acidic flavor from its lemon juice (like this lemon vinaigrette), Meyer lemons won’t deliver the same results as regular lemons in these cases.

If you want to make a Meyer lemon recipe but don’t have any on hand, you can substitute a mix of equal parts fresh lemon juice and orange juice or tangerine juice. You can also substitute equal parts lemon zest and orange, tangerine, or tangerine zest for grated Meyer lemon zest.


When are Meyer lemons in season?

Meyer lemons are available in stores between December and May. Their limited season and fragile skin (which makes them harder to ship) naturally make them more expensive and harder to find than ordinary lemons.

While the season may be short, you can easily extend it with the help of your freezer. To freeze Meyer lemon juice for later use, freeze the juice in ice cube trays. Transfer the cubes to a freezer bag and store them for up to six months. You can also store the peeled skins by drying them in the sun and adding them to salts, cures and marinades.


Where to buy Meyer lemons

Because of their thin skins, Meyer lemons don’t travel well and aren’t as widely available as regular lemons. They will be more widely available in citrus growing regions (looking at you, Florida). You can find them in some specialty and organic markets during the winter and spring months.


How to store Meyer lemons

Store Meyer lemons in a sealed plastic bag in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. When stored in the refrigerator, Meyer Lemons will keep for up to a week. Stored at room temperature, they will keep for a few days.

Related:

  • Get ready for our top 21 sweet/tart lemon desserts
  • 5 Lively Recipes Lemon Lovers Will Love
  • More lemon recipes.


Video about Difference Between Meyer Lemon And Regular Lemon

Meyer Lemon v Regular Lemons, Navel Orange Season

Meyer Lemons are known as the ultimate Culinary Lemon. Jon Steffy tastes tests Meyers versus regular Lemons, and talks about peak season for bright and sweet California Navel Oranges.

Organic Meyer Lemons – https://producegeek.com/organic-meyer-lemons/
Navel Oranges – https://producegeek.com/navel-oranges/

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