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1 Packet Of Gelatin Equals How Many Sheets

How to use gelatin

Photo by Meredith.

If you follow The Great British Bake Off or have European cookbooks, you’ve probably come across references to gelatin sheets or jelly leaves. Luckily for American bakers, gelatin sheets are increasingly available in the United States, both in specialty stores and online. If you can’t find it, here’s a little manual on how to use both types and how to substitute one for the other.


How to use gelatin powder

Gelatin powder
Photo by Allrecipes.

This needs to be rehydrated before using it. Always use cold water (or juice or other liquid): If you start dissolving the gelatin before it’s rehydrated, you’ll have small dry granules scattered in bits all over the dessert. Sprinkle the gelatin over the liquid and set aside for 5 to 10 minutes to absorb; it will puff up and look a bit like applesauce.

Once the gelatin is hydrated, it’s time to dissolve it. You can make it by mixing it into a hot liquid such as a custard (crème Anglaise) or juice, or you can melt it in a double boiler. If you’re careful, you can even melt it in a stainless steel bowl placed over a gas burner on your stove, but that’s for gamblers and professionals, because it’s easy to burn it and/or burn your fingers. Make sure the gelatin granules are completely dissolved before proceeding with your recipe.

gelatin sheets and powder


How to use gelatin sheets

To make matters more complicated, there are different types of gelatin sheets, each with different gelling or “bloom” strengths. I go with the gelatin silver foil, which I have used more often.

To use it, simply place the gelatin sheets in a bowl filled with cold water. After being soaked for about five minutes, they are rehydrated. Hold them gently in one hand and wipe the water off the sheets with the fingers of the other hand. Gelatin dissolves quickly when stirred into hot liquid or heated in a water bath.


How to work with gelatin in recipes

  • There is a bit of a “ticking of time” pressure when working with gelatin: once you fold a cold item like whipped cream into the base at room temperature, the gelatin will begin to set. You must have everything ready before you start mixing the components of your dessert. Make your own baked pie shell, pie layers, or dessert tumblers.
  • If something happens, you can melt the gelatin again as a safety net for later use. If it’s in a custard or juice base, just pop it in the fridge until you have time to finish your dessert. Gently heat the base until it is fluid, allow it to cool to room temperature and proceed with the recipe. Once the whipped cream or meringue is incorporated, however, it’s time to use it or lose it and pour the dessert into the molds.
  • Gelatin-stabilized desserts should chill 24 hours, or at least overnight, before serving.

How much to use

According to Knox(R) authorities, 1 bag of powdered gelatin has the same gelling strength as 5 sheets (about 3 x 8.5 inches) of gelatin leaves. According to other bakers I trust, there’s a range: David Lebovitz says, “Three-and-a-half sheets seem to work best for me. I use 3-by-5-inch sheets.” Are you doing something that you’re going to slice? Add an extra half or full sheet. Is that something you’re pulling off a plate? Keep it sleek and go for a texture on the softer side.


Favorite recipes stabilized with gelatin

Stabilized whipped cream glaze

This is great piped onto a pie – especially the pumpkin Bavarian cream pie (“tart”) listed below – or pie.

Stabilized whipped cream glaze
Photo by sweetserenade.

Pumpkin Bavarian cream tart

As I noted on a photo for the recipe I posted here, “I poured rosettes of whipped cream over the Pumpkin Bavarian Cream Tart and topped with grated nutmeg. The cream held up well, about four days in the refrigerator (provided it the cake lasted!” Slices beautifully!

Tart-Bavarian-Cream-Pumpkin

No-bake lime mousse

This is a great recipe for summer.

No-bake lime mousse cakes
Photo by Maria Robertston Klein.

Peppermint Bavarian Cake

And here’s one I intend to try for Christmas, using pasteurized egg whites for the filling:

Cream pie and peppermint bavarois
dkboyd


If you follow The Great British Bake Off or have European cookbooks, you’ve probably come across references to gelatin sheets or jelly leaves. Luckily for American bakers, gelatin sheets are increasingly available in the United States, both in specialty stores and online. If you can’t find it, here’s a little manual on how to use both types and how to substitute one for the other.


How to use gelatin powder

Gelatin powder
Photo by Allrecipes.

This needs to be rehydrated before using it. Always use cold water (or juice or other liquid): If you start dissolving the gelatin before it’s rehydrated, you’ll have small dry granules scattered in bits all over the dessert. Sprinkle the gelatin over the liquid and set aside for 5 to 10 minutes to absorb; it will puff up and look a bit like applesauce.

Once the gelatin is hydrated, it’s time to dissolve it. You can make it by mixing it into a hot liquid such as a custard (crème Anglaise) or juice, or you can melt it in a double boiler. If you’re careful, you can even melt it in a stainless steel bowl placed over a gas burner on your stove, but that’s for gamblers and professionals, because it’s easy to burn it and/or burn your fingers. Make sure the gelatin granules are completely dissolved before proceeding with your recipe.

gelatin sheets and powder


How to use gelatin sheets

To make matters more complicated, there are different types of gelatin sheets, each with different gelling or “bloom” strengths. I go with the gelatin silver foil, which I have used more often.

To use it, simply place the gelatin sheets in a bowl filled with cold water. After being soaked for about five minutes, they are rehydrated. Hold them gently in one hand and wipe the water off the sheets with the fingers of the other hand. Gelatin dissolves quickly when stirred into hot liquid or heated in a water bath.


How to work with gelatin in recipes

  • There is a bit of a “ticking of time” pressure when working with gelatin: once you fold a cold item like whipped cream into the base at room temperature, the gelatin will begin to set. You must have everything ready before you start mixing the components of your dessert. Make your own baked pie shell, pie layers, or dessert tumblers.
  • If something happens, you can melt the gelatin again as a safety net for later use. If it’s in a custard or juice base, just pop it in the fridge until you have time to finish your dessert. Gently heat the base until it is fluid, allow it to cool to room temperature and proceed with the recipe. Once the whipped cream or meringue is incorporated, however, it’s time to use it or lose it and pour the dessert into the molds.
  • Gelatin-stabilized desserts should chill 24 hours, or at least overnight, before serving.

How much to use

According to Knox(R) authorities, 1 bag of powdered gelatin has the same gelling strength as 5 sheets (about 3 x 8.5 inches) of gelatin leaves. According to other bakers I trust, there’s a range: David Lebovitz says, “Three-and-a-half sheets seem to work best for me. I use 3-by-5-inch sheets.” Are you doing something that you’re going to slice? Add an extra half or full sheet. Is it something you’re pulling off a plate? Keep it sleek and go for a texture on the softer side.


Favorite recipes stabilized with gelatin

Stabilized whipped cream glaze

This is great piped onto a pie – especially the pumpkin Bavarian cream pie (“tart”) listed below – or pie.

Stabilized whipped cream glaze
Photo by sweetserenade.

Pumpkin Bavarian cream tart

As I noted on a photo for the recipe I posted here, “I poured rosettes of whipped cream over the Pumpkin Bavarian Cream Tart and topped with grated nutmeg. The cream held up well, about four days in the refrigerator (provided it the cake lasted!” Slices beautifully!

Tart-Bavarian-Cream-Pumpkin

No-bake lime mousse

This is a great recipe for summer.

No-bake lime mousse cakes
Photo by Maria Robertston Klein.

Peppermint Bavarian Cake

And here’s one I intend to try for Christmas, using pasteurized egg whites for the filling:

Cream pie and peppermint bavarois
dkboyd


Video about 1 Packet Of Gelatin Equals How Many Sheets

Understanding Gelatin: Sheets V. Powder Pt 1 of 3

Complete Article & Further Info: https://stellaculinary.com/podcasts/video/the-basics-of-gelatin-sheets-vs-powder-part-1-of-3

In this three part video series, we discuss one of the most common gelling agents used in the western kitchen, gelatin. To lay a firm foundation, I thought it was best to start our discussion with the two major types of gelatin available to cooks, sheets and powder.

Gelatin Sheets vs. Powder

Gelatin sheets are almost exclusively used in the professional kitchen, versus powder, which is more common in supermarkets. Yet with the advent of professional level cook books, gelatin in sheet form is quickly becoming easier to find. If you’re interested in working with gelatin sheets but your local supermarket only carries powder, you can easily purchase them on Amazon.com, in their various grades. If purchasing gelatin sheets, I would recommend the silver grade, since they’re the most common in professional recipes and have an intermediate level bloom strength. This makes them easy to adapt to almost any recipe without much adjustment required.

The subject of gelatin sheets can get confusing due to their separation into grades, which are bronze, silver, gold and platinum. Each grade is associated with various “bloom strengths,” or their ability to set a gel. This means that gram for gram, platinum will…

Continue Reading: https://stellaculinary.com/podcasts/video/the-basics-of-gelatin-sheets-vs-powder-part-1-of-3

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